Abstract

A Trusted Platform Module (TPM) is a security device included in most modern desktop and laptop computers. It helps keep the computing environment secure by isolating cryptographic functions and data from the CPU. A TPM is usually implemented with a small microcontroller which is near the main processor. In addition to a microcontroller, it may employ hardware acceleration to assist in cryptographic computations. When vulnerabilities are found, or new algorithms developed, TPMs become obsolete because the hardware accelerators cannot be upgraded. This thesis presents a proof of concept implementation of a TPM on an FPGA. By using an FPGA, the TPM gains the ability to be upgraded or have new cryptographic modules added. This new design easily fits on the Zynq FPGA used in this work, with room left over for additional functionality. We explore the feasibility of this approach, including the added cost of the FPGA, and the added benefits of reconfigurable hardware.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Ira A. Fulton College of Engineering and Technology; Electrical and Computer Engineering

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2017-03-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd9130

Keywords

FPGA, TPM, Cryptography, Trusted Computing

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