Abstract

This self-study explores the question of "What factors in my life shaped my journey in earning an American college degree and becoming a successful educator in the U.S.?" This question is explored in the context of my own lived experiences. Results contribute to the field of immigrant studies and may encourage others who wish to transition from first generation immigrant to successful professional educator in the U.S. This study employed hermeneutic phenomenology to answer the research question. It used in-depth narrative interviews to elicit my responses to lived experiences from growing up in Mexico to my current teaching position. Thematic analysis was used to summarize and interpret the data. Data analysis yielded six themes that describe my journey to becoming a teacher in the U.S.: family influence, vision of life, role models, challenges, sources of support, and inner strength. Findings reaffirm the belief that it is possible for an individual who has recently immigrated to the United States and who may have experienced aspects of structural inequality to surmount difficult circumstances and achieve important life goals.

Degree

MS

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Counseling Psychology and Special Education

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2015-07-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd8048

Keywords

cultural capital, hispanic American culture, immigrants, multicultural education, learning disabilities

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