Abstract

This study investigated two aspects of masculine gender role strain—gender role conflict and gender role stress—and their relationship to religious orientation, spiritual well-being, and sex-role egalitarianism among Latter-day Saint (LDS or Mormon) men. To investigate these variables, a sample of 201 LDS undergraduate men who were predominantly White/Caucasian and single completed the Gender Role Conflict Scale, Masculine Gender Role Stress Scale, Intrinsic/Extrinsic Religious Orientation Scale-Revised, Spiritual Well-Being Scale, and the Sex-Role Egalitarianism Scale. As predicted, LDS men who reported higher levels of religiosity and spiritual well-being reported lower levels of gender role strain. This study also found that participants who reported more egalitarian sex-role attitudes reported lower levels of gender role strain. Separate stepwise regression analyses found that, of the five predictor variables (intrinsic religiosity, extrinsic religiosity, existential well-being, religious well-being, and sex-role egalitarianism), existential well-being and sex-role egalitarianism were the strongest predictors of variance in gender role conflict and gender role stress. The discussion focuses on explanations of significant findings, limitations, directions for future research, and implications for clinical practice.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Counseling Psychology and Special Education

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2015-04-01

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd7708

Keywords

men, masculine gender role conflict, spiritual well-being, LDS, Mormon

Share

COinS