Abstract

This study aimed to examine online Mormon self-presentation, specifically in the context of Mormon.org and LDSSingles.com (LDSSO). To examine the different styles of self-presentation used in Mormon.org and LDSSO profiles, this study drew upon self-presentation theory (Goffman, 1959; Jones, 1990; Jones & Pittman, 1982) and analyzed profiles according to Dominick's (1990) definitions of Jones and Pittman's (1982) five self-presentation strategies. In addition, this study examined the relationship between a profile poster's sex and the self-presentation strategies exhibited in his or her Mormon.org or LDSSO profile. Content analysis of 100 (50 male and 50 female) Mormon.org and 100 (50 male and 50 female) LDSSO profiles revealed ingratiation (LDSSO) and self-promotion (Mormon.org) as the leading self-presentation strategies in the profile sample. Additionally, this study found that exemplification was the second most prevalent self-presentation strategy in both Mormon.org and LDSSO profiles. These results indicate that online Mormon profilers want to be perceived as moral, devout, and admirable, not only likeable and competent and that Mormon profilers may tailor their self-presentation strategies to accomplish social goals. No statistically significant difference was found between a profile poster's sex and the individual or predominant self-presentation strategies, suggesting that Mormon conversion and values may influence Mormon discussion, interpersonal interaction, and ultimately, one's self-presentation.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Fine Arts and Communications; Communications

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2015-05-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd7535

Keywords

strategic self-presentation, Mormon, gender, online self-presentation

Included in

Communication Commons

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