Abstract

This study was an analysis of the relationship between LDS religiosity of college students and their attitudes concerning birth control and abortion.

The respondents in this research were LDS college students attending Brigham Young University Fall Semester 1970. Goodman and Kruskal's gamma and a difference of means test were used to measure association and difference to determine the statistical significance of the responses as related to religiosity and attitudes concerning birth control and abortion.

The results of the study showed that (1) there was a positive relationship between conservative attitudes toward birth control and abortion and one's degree of measured religiosity, (2) there was a significant difference between the attitude toward personal practice of birth control and abortion and the practice permitted to others outside the religious group membership, (3) attitudes toward birth control and abortion within the religious membership group were significantly more particularistic than universalistic, (4) there was a positive correlation between a person's attitude towards birth control and abortion and perception of church teachings and (5) of the cluster factor influencing the attitudes towards birth control and abortion, religion was found to be the most significant.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Sociology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1971

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm587

Keywords

Brigham Young University, Students, Birth control, Religious aspects, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints