Abstract

Other-centeredness and depression were examined to see if a relationship existed between the two. One scale measuring other-centeredness and another measuring depression were given to a sample of married Mormon women who did not work outside the home. Other-centeredness and depression were significantly negatively correlated. The women scoring in the top one-third of the range of other-centeredness scores suffered no depression on the depression scale. The factor most predictive for depression was the relationship the women had with her husband, and other-centeredness was found to overlap with this variable to some extent. The factors of health, income, and education were also better predictors of depression than other-centeredness. When they are held constant the relationship between other-centeredness and depression increases substantially.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Psychology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1994

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm531

Keywords

Mormon women, Depression, Mental

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