Abstract

The public image of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the product of several factors. This thesis investigates that image as presented in national periodicals from 1970 to 1981. During this time "Mormons" and "Mormonism" was a popular topic as the religion gained notoriety, and as an awareness of its peculiar beliefs and practices increased.

The rationale for using national magazines to assess public image is the assumption that they "reflect prevailing points of view" and help "formulate public opinion." Since popular attitudes are one of the factors that influence how the Church is accepted in the world, this study will enhance the reader's understanding pertaining to the factors that molded those views.

This study was preceded by a thesis covering the same subject from 1961-1970 by Dale P. Pelo, and a doctoral dissertation covering 1850-1961 by Richard O. Cowan.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Religious Education; Church History and Doctrine

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2003-08-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm530

Keywords

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, In mass media, History, 20th century, Mormons, Press coverage, United States, Public opinion, Journal

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