Abstract

Between 1853 and 1914 the kingdom of Prussia and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the Mormons, disagreed over the issue of Mormon missionaries proselyting in Prussia. In 1853 royal magistrates banished all Mormon missionaries from the kingdom for advocating emigration. A new church policy of preaching without seeking for official permission, in addition to an improved relationship between the Mormons in Utah and the United States government after the Manifesto of 1890, led to an increase in missionaries sent to Germany, including Prussia. By 1900 mormon success alarmed the Prussian Protestant clergy and a few Prussian governors as well. The governor near the Russian border banished Mormon missionaries as "undesirable" foreigners. In response to an appeal by the United States Embassy, the Prussian Interior Minister decided in December, 1902 that the Mormons posed a threat to the public morality of Prussia. He issued a new banishment decree in 1903. Despite this decree and increased scrutiny by local police officials, Mormons continued to work in Prussia, enjoying limited success until World War I put a hiatus on American Mormon missionary work in Europe.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; History

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1994

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm493

Keywords

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Germany, Prussia, History, Missions, Church history, Church, state

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