Abstract

Teton Valley, throughout many centuries, has attracted several occupance groups, each interacting with the environment in various ways for various reasons. Indian and explorer contact did little to alter the surroundings. More frequent contact came, however, as trappers and traders visited the valley to trap beaver and meet in rendezvous.

The end of intensified fur trapping slowed contact with the basin. Government personnel, a painter, a few squawmen and horse thieves were the only inhabitants because Indians, remoteness, and harsh climatic conditions kept others out until 1882 when permanent agricultural settlers entered the valley. Hundreds of people followed, many of whom were Mormons from Utah. During this sequence major changes took place. Unique Mormon settlement patterns developed. Increase in agricultural and industrial productivity and population continued until the 1940's, but as enterprises failed people moved out. In the late 1960's the need for a new drawing force was recognized. A ski resort was built, attracting people to the valley to take advantage of the newly created recreational facilities, towns, and businesses.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Geography

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1974

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm274

Keywords

Teton River Valley, Idaho, History, Mormons, Mormon landscape

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