Abstract

A gap exists between the religious ideals of human behavior and the common practices of man. Considerable effort has been expended in attempts to discover how to teach men to behave in ways that would be acceptable to society and still satisfy the ideals of the various religions. This problem is one of the major concerns of religious education.

In an effort to solve the above problem among its membership, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has established a program of week-day religious instruction, commonly referred to as the "Seminary program." This organization is currently engaged in an organized effort to develop for its own use a more effective curriculum. This curriculum is being developed around thirty-three directional objectives which were formulated by a committee.

The purpose of this study was to examine the general scope and validity of the Seminary's directional objectives. To accomplish this these objectives were compared with the subject areas or themes which have been stressed most often by the nine Presidents of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in their annual conference addresses since the Church was organized in 1830.

Degree

MRE

College and Department

Religious Education; Church History and Doctrine

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1963

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm240

Keywords

Mormon seminaries, Curricula, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Education, Doctrines

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