Abstract

This dissertation presents the findings of a study examining the following questions: How do students in a particular disability group differ from students in other disability groups in the degree to which they accept their disability? How are level of functional impairment and acceptance related? How are an individual's view of disability as a defining characteristic and acceptance related? How are functional impairment and the degree to which disability is seen as a defining characteristic related? Analysis using ANOVA indicated that there was not a significant difference in the level of acceptance between disability groups. Three Pearson's r correlation analyses were conducted using the total score on the Acceptance of Disability Scale- Revised (ADS-R), the clients' self-apprised level of functional impairment, and the degree to which disability is seen as a defining characteristic. All analyses resulted in significant correlations. Results of the first analysis indicated that there is a significant correlation between acceptance of disability and functional impairment. Results of the second analysis indicate that there is a significant correlation between acceptance of disability and the degree to which disability is seen as a defining characteristic. Results of the third analysis indicate that there is a significant correlation between functional impairment and the degree to which disability is seen as a defining characteristic.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Counseling Psychology and Special Education

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2013-07-12

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd6489

Keywords

Disability, acceptance, college students, postsecondary, disability group

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