Abstract

Defining the Fremont archaeological culture has challenged archaeologists for decades. There is still considerable debate about the origins of the Fremont, their eventual demise, their genetic relationship to modern Native American tribes, and myriad other issues. In nearly a century of Fremont research, socio-political, economic, and religious complexity remain elusive subjects. Examining technological style, the manifestation of socially influenced choices during each step of production as a means of passive communication, is one useful avenue to examine Fremont material culture to uncover the social patterns they may, or may not contain. I examine whether or not technological style in Fremont Snake Valley corrugated pottery hold traces of social identity produced by Fremont potters living in the Parowan Valley, Utah.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Anthropology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2013-07-05

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd6424

Keywords

Native Americans, Utah, Fremont, Parowan Valley, Snake Valley Corrugated Ceramics

Included in

Anthropology Commons

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