Abstract

This thesis reports on an evaluative study of the first 300-level Spanish class at Brigham Young University. The information gathered describes the history of the class and changes in curriculum and goals over the years. It also describes students who have taken the class: native Spanish speakers, heritage speakers, returned missionaries, students from lower-levels, students with a background in another Romance language, and presents information as to how well the class has met the needs of each group of students, as well as suggestions to better meet student needs. Results indicate that there is a general satisfaction with the first 300-level Spanish class across the different categories of Spanish students in this class. Data also indicate that additional review of the class may be beneficial in order to 1) increase horizontal articulation, 2) better meet General Education requirements, 3) increase the student preparedness from Spanish 206 to 321, and 4) improve instructor training.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Humanities; Spanish and Portuguese

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2013-12-19

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd6722

Keywords

Returned missionary, evaluation, Spanish, upper-division Spanish, lower-level Spanish

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