Abstract

Leaders in K-12 education in Hawai'i are increasingly advocating for and utilizing the culture and knowledge of the kānaka Maoli, the native people of these islands, as a context for learning in a variety of curricular disciplines and approaches (Benham & Heck, 1998; Kani'iaupuni, Ledward & Jensen, 2010; Kana'iaupuni & Malone, 2006; Kahakalau, 2004; Meyer, 2004). To expand upon this trend, this thesis uses a combination of autoethnographic and critical indigenous methodologies to present a personal narrative that looks specifically at approaching art education from a Maoli perspective. Through extensive participant/observer reflections, two place-based and culture-based art education experiences are juxtaposed with an experience working on a culturally-based collaborative mural project. Four significant kuamo'o, a concept which holds multiple meanings, including: "backbone, spine; road, trail path; custom, way," (Puku'i & Elbert, 1986), emerge as significant markers of meaningful Maoli-based art education: 1) mo'oku'auhau, genealogy and acknowledgement of those who have come before us, 2) mo'olelo, stories which belong to our place, 3) an idea that I am labeling pili ka mo'o, which literally means, the lizard is intertwined but can be translated through metaphor to mean someone who is intimate and deeply connected, and 4) aloha, a profound and honest love.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Fine Arts and Communications; Visual Arts

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2014-03-13

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd6792

Keywords

Hawai'i, art education, place-based education, culture-based education, autoethnography, critical indigenous inquiry or critical indigenous pedagogy

Included in

Art Practice Commons

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