Abstract

The scholarly study of materialism is becoming more common in a variety of disciplines. This thesis provides an empirical review of this burgeoning body of literature by conducting a meta-analysis of the relationship between materialism and psychological well-being. A weighted overall effect size from 47 published and unpublished samples indicated that materialism was significantly related to lower psychological well-being. This effect size was modest in strength (r = .159). Materialism scale, psychological scale valance, age of sample, and publication status of the study did not moderate this relationship. Culture did moderate the relationship, with a stronger relationship in individualistic cultures than in collectivist cultures. Implications for individuals, professionals, and organizations are discussed, and critiques of the extant literature, as well as suggestions for future research, are offered.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Family Life; Marriage, Family, and Human Development

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2012-12-07

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd5786

Keywords

materialism, psychological well-being, meta-analysis

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