Abstract

Research surrounding the steeplechase is scarce, with most research focusing primarily on how biomechanical factors relate to maintaining running speed while crossing barriers. One area that has not been well explored is the relationship between biomechanical factors and hurdling economy. The purpose of this study was to investigate how performance times and biomechanical variables relate to hurdling economy during the steeplechase. This was accomplished by measuring running economy of collegiate and professional steeplechasers while running with and without hurdles. Biomechanical measures of approach velocity, take-off distance, clearance height, and lead knee extension while hurdling, as well as steeplechase performance times were correlated to a ratio of running economy with and without hurdles. Results indicated no correlation between steeplechase performance time and the ratio of running economy during the hurdle and non-hurdle laps. Results also indicated no correlation between the aforementioned biomechanical variables and ratio of running economy during the hurdle and non-hurdle laps. Increasing approach velocity did not negatively affect running economy. Steeplechasers may continue to increase approach velocity without hurting their economy or performance times.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Life Sciences; Exercise Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2013-06-27

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd6345

Keywords

steeplechase, running economy, hurdle economy, biomechanics

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