Abstract

Internet use is a routine element of daily life in the early 21st century for many middle-class Americans. Today, millions of middle-class American mothers read and write online web-logs detailing motherhood and domestic life and mom blogs, formerly known as "mommy blogs," facilitate substantial economic activity. Participants collectively invest millions of hours in these blogs, sharing information and experiences, and offering each other validation and support. The present qualitative study of American mom blogs uses traditional grounded theory methods as well as Netnography techniques to investigate the thematic content found in the publicly posted text of 25 different mom blogs during 2011. Aspects of Goffman's theory of Dramaturgy and Chayko's theory of portable communities provide an interpretive framework for my findings. These findings suggest that mom blogs give participating mothers the power of voice which they use to publish highly controlled, yet powerful messages that communicate the values and role definitions of early 21st century motherhood to a growing online community. Messages tend to portray standards, styles, and secrets of contemporary, middle-class American motherhood.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Sociology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2012-12-05

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd5743

Keywords

blogging, mom blogs, mothering, mothers and technology, female internet use, contemporary American mothering

Included in

Sociology Commons

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