Abstract

To meet the purpose of the study, three hypotheses were tested: First, it was predicted there was a relationship between spousal connectedness and personal and spousal ICT (information and communication technology) device usage; second, it was predicted satisfaction with personal or spousal ICT device usage were mediators of the primary relationship between spousal connectedness and ICT device usage; and third, it was expected communication moderated the relationship between spousal connectedness and personal ICT device usage. A representative sample of married adults (n=208) were sampled. Personal and spousal ICT device use, satisfaction with personal and spousal ICT device use, spousal connectedness, and communication were measured and the resulting data analyzed. Regression analyses and path analyses were performed to test the hypotheses. The first and third hypotheses were found to be significant, but the second was not. The negative relationship between personal ICT device use and spousal connectedness indicates that as ICT device use increases, connectedness decreases. Communication, however, was shown to buffer this relationship. Data indicated that the more a person recalled communicating with their spouse, the less prominent was the relationship between their personal ICT device use and spousal connectedness.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Marriott School of Management; Recreation Management

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2012-03-16

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd5135

Keywords

connectedness, ICT device, spouse, communication

Share

COinS