Abstract

With the increase in federal funding for the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) after-school program, more intricate evaluations are needed to assess the needs and successes of the programs. And with many programs targeting students of minority and limited-English proficiency (LEP) status, additional analyses should focus on these targeted populations. This study examines a regional 21st CCLC program with math and English standardized test scores (CRT scores) for students prior to participation and after two years of participation. These test scores were used to create a score change variable, which provides a unique approach to assessing after-school programs. Analyses indicate that LEP participants are the furthest behind and have the most to gain by participating in the program. Also, the type of activity participated in matters. Overall, participants benefit from both academic and enrichment activities, but LEP participants benefit most from academic activities and from higher participation. Site coordinators need to be aware of the different types of participants and structure programs accordingly.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Sociology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2012-07-09

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd5471

Keywords

after-school, 21st CCLC, education, limited English proficiency

Included in

Sociology Commons

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