Abstract

The anterior cingulate has been implicated in a number of cognitive processes that are at risk following traumatic brain injury (TBI), such as executive function and emotional processing. While the cingulate is believed to play a role in the above-mentioned cognitive processes, the relative roles of gray and white matter in functional outcomes post-TBI are not fully understood. The current study investigated various quantifiable brain properties (e.g., cortical thickness and volume, volume of underlying white matter, and white matter integrity) of the caudal anterior cingulate (CAC) gyrus and their relationships with behavioral measures of cognitive control following pediatric TBI. Parent ratings at three months post-injury indicated that TBI children demonstrated greater difficulty inhibiting inappropriate behavior and effectively transitioning between tasks. Reductions of CAC white matter integrity were observed in TBI participants, in the absence of significant morphometric group differences in this region. Neither CAC morphometrics nor fractional anisotropy (FA) were associated with experimental measures of cognitive control. The current findings indicate that DTI metrics may be more sensitive to brain changes in the region of the CAC following TBI. While strong relationships were not observed between CAC properties and measures of cognitive control, it is possible that study limitations may have obscured potential findings.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Psychology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2012-02-25

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd4992

Keywords

anterior cingulate, pediatric traumatic brain injury, MRI, DTI, cognitive control

Included in

Psychology Commons

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