Abstract

Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is an emerging joining technology in which basic process understanding is still inadequate. Knowledge of FSW parameter relationships is needed to better understand the process and implement proper machine control. This study utilized a 3-factor, 3-level factorial design of experiments to investigate relationships between key process inputs and measured output parameters. All experiments utilized 7075-T7 aluminum and a threaded pin tool with a 25.4 mm shoulder diameter, 4.76 mm pin length, and 7.9 mm pin diameter. Spindle speed, feed rate, and tool depth were varied throughout 54 welds while X, Y, and Z forces, X torque, three tool temperatures, and motor power were measured. Empirical models were developed to relate outputs to inputs. The relationships between inputs and outputs are nonlinear and require, at a minimum, a quadratic equation to reasonably model them. These models were further analyzed to explore possible control schemes. Tool depth was found to be the most fundamental means of controlling weld forces and tool temperatures. This research describes the input/output relationships enumerated above for FSW as well as a discussion of possible control schemes.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Ira A. Fulton College of Engineering and Technology; Mechanical Engineering

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2005-03-14

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd732

Keywords

friction stir welding, FSW, statistical design of experiments, DOE, 7075 aluminum, machine control, parameter relationships, process inputs/outputs

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