Abstract

Research by a number of scholars working with different data has shown validity for a contextual model of relationships whereby a person's background characteristics affects or predicts her/his interpersonal style, which then affects or predicts her/his relationship satisfaction. This study tests if this relationship model is equivalent across four different cultural samples. This research also presents descriptive family data on a sample from Micronesia, a culture that has not previously been described in family science literature, compared to three other cultural groups. A total of 550 individuals from Micronesian (N=131), Hispanic-Americans (N=139), Non-LDS Caucasians (N=140), and LDS-Caucasians (N=140) filled out an extensive relationship assessment survey (RELATE). Descriptive and diagnostic data will be provided for each of the items and constructs in the data for each of the four samples. Comparisons between the samples on categorical variables show many unique patterns. The Micronesian and US samples especially show a number of patterns that were unique from the other samples. This test of the contextual model shows that the model seemed to work in general for all four cultural samples, although the specific items within different parts of the model seemed to show unique patterns in the various cultures.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Family Life; Marriage, Family, and Human Development

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2005-03-08

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd706

Keywords

Cross-cultural, relationship, Micronesian, LDS, Hispanic, Contextual Model

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