Abstract

City growth policies codify community values and serve as the basis for enforcement of community standards. If these policies do not match resident preferences for growth, potential exists for communities to grow in ways which make the community undesirable. This thesis examines whether adopted city growth policies match resident preferences in small towns in Utah. Findings include a strong relationship between resident preferences and city leader preferences for growth. Also, city staffs are poor readers of public sentiment relative to growth and growth management. Some cities are more effective in enacting city policies to match resident attitudes towards growth than others, specifically; it seems that cities which have already experienced growth have policies which more closely match resident preferences. This thesis has relevance to the adoption of city growth policies in rural Utah cities. Since city staffs in small towns tend to be poor readers of resident attitudes, whereas city elected officials are much better readers of public opinion, it is important that city policy be instituted at the impetus of elected leaders rather than on the recommendation of city personnel. Failure to adopt city policies regarding growth may lead to growth which is undesirable to city residents.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Geography

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2010-07-09

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd3772

Keywords

Planning, Policy, Public, Perception, Small-Town, Utah, Growth, Attitudes, Rural

Included in

Geography Commons

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