Abstract

Friction Bit Joining (FBJ) is a recently developed spot joining technology capable of joining dissimilar metals. A consumable bit cuts through the upper layer of metal to be joined, then friction welds to the lower layer. The bit then snaps off, leaving a flange. This research focuses on FBJ using DP980 or DP590 steel as the lower layer, AZ31 magnesium alloy as the top layer, and 4140 or 4130 steel as the bit material. In order to determine optimal settings for the magnesium/steel joints, experimentation was performed using a purpose-built computer controlled welding machine, varying factors such as rotational speeds, plunge speed, cutting and welding depths, and dwell times. It was determined that, when using 1.6 mm thick coupons, maximum joint strengths would be obtained at a 2.03 mm cutting depth, 3.30 mm welding depth, and 2500 RPM welding speed. At these levels, the weld is stronger than the magnesium alloy, resulting in failure in the AZ31 rather than in the FBJ joint in lap shear testing.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Ira A. Fulton College of Engineering and Technology; Technology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2010-07-14

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd3831

Keywords

Rebecca Gardner, FBJ, friction bit joining, spot joining, dissimilar metals, magnesium, high strength steel

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