Abstract

This longitudinal study investigated the potential moderating effects of attachment on negative marital interaction and positive child outcomes, specifically school engagement and child self-regulation. Waves I and II of data were drawn from the Flourishing Families Project; participants were 296 two parent families (fathers, mothers and children ages 10-13). Both observational and questionnaire data were used in data collection. Negative marital interaction was assessed using observational codes from the Iowa Family Interaction Rating Scales. All three family members' perceptions were used in assessing parent/child attachment and the potential positive child outcomes of school engagement and child self-regulation. As negative marital interaction increased, both school engagement and the child's self-regulation decreased. Only mother's attachment with child was a statistically significant moderating variable for the relationship between negative marital interaction and the child's school engagement. Gender effects showed that girls were more engaged in school and more self-regulated than boys. Implications for family therapy interventions with problems of child school engagement and self-regulation are explored.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Family Life; Marriage and Family Therapy

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2009-07-13

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd3048

Keywords

Negative Marital Interaction, positive child outcomes, parent/child attachment, moderating variable

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