Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between parenting factors and Hispanic adolescent substance use and depression. Specifically, the study examined the relationship between parental support, parental knowledge, and parental psychological control among Hispanic adolescents' use of alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, hard drugs and depressive symptoms. The sample included 839 Hispanic (primarily Mexican) 9th – 12th graders from west Texas area school districts who were given a self-reported survey to assess parental behaviors, substance use, and adolescent depression. Using structural equation modeling (SEM), findings indicated that higher levels of maternal support were related to lower levels of depressive symptoms for both males and female adolescents. Maternal knowledge was found to be significantly associated, for both adolescent genders, with decreased levels of substance use. Paternal knowledge was significantly associated with decreased depressive symptoms in male adolescents. Maternal and paternal psychological control was found to be significantly associated to increased levels of depressive symptoms in female adolescents, whereas only paternal psychological control was found to be significantly associated to increased levels of depressive symptoms in male adolescents. Age was not significantly related to depressive symptoms or substance use. Results are discussed along with implications for therapists working with Hispanic populations.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Family Life; Marriage and Family Therapy

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2010-03-10

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd3428

Keywords

Hispanic, adolescents, depression, substance use, parenting, support, knowledge, psychological control

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