Abstract

This study examined the differences between normal vocal fold vibration and the movement patterns of vocal folds with mass lesions by means of a synthetic model. The experimenter molded and cast three sets of vocal folds, representing normal structure, small nodules, and larger nodules. Acoustic, aerodynamic, and digital video signals were recorded and analyzed in order to quantify air flow and pressure, measure vibratory stability, and visually assess closure patterns across the three structural conditions. Statistical analysis revealed that the presence of vocal nodules resulted in a significantly higher onset pressure, fundamental frequency, airflow at onset, and offset pressure. However, the results were inconclusive with regard to vocal stability, and it remains unclear whether the current models of nodules are sufficiently similar to the human system to adequately model the type of mass lesions typically seen in a clinical context.

Degree

MS

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Communication Disorders

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2009-03-19

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd2852

Keywords

Vocal folds, physiology, physical modeling, vocal nodules, synthetic modeling

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