Abstract

This study examined differences between Latter-Day Saint (LDS) and non-Latter-Day Saint (non-LDS) females across six universities in the United States regarding desire to engage in substance use and eating behaviors in response to negative emotion. Additionally, this study explored differences between LDS and non-LDS females regarding body image, as well as body image differences between LDS females residing inside Utah and outside Utah. Findings suggested that non-LDS females were more likely to experience increased urges to use substances in response to negative emotion than LDS females, consistent with LDS doctrine teaching the avoidance of substance use. LDS females also did not appear to substitute LDS-sanctioned eating behaviors for substance use in response to negative emotion, as has previously been suggested by other researchers. Additionally, LDS females were found to have more positive body image than non-LDS females generally, although LDS females in Utah have less positive body images than LDS females residing in other states. Body image findings are substantial since body image distress is rampant and is a risk factor for the development of eating disorders. Clinical implications, limitations, and future directions are discussed.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Psychology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2007-06-25

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd1898

Keywords

eating, eating behaviors, eating disorders, substances, substance use, substance abuse, body image, Latter-Day Saints, LDS, religion

Included in

Psychology Commons

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