Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of family leisure involvement to the family functioning of single-parent families among a large national representative sample. Two samples were gathered. The single-parent sample consisted of 384 families (384 parents and 384 youth). The dual-parent sample consisted of 495 families (495 parents and 495 youth). Data were analyzed from the parent, youth, and family perspective using two instruments. The Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale (FACES II) was used to measure family functioning and the Family Leisure Activity Profile (FLAP) was used to measure family leisure involvement. Blocked multiple regression analysis indicated a positive relationship between family leisure variables and family functioning variables among single-parent families. Family cohesion and family adaptability were affected by both core and balance activities, while family adaptability was affected slightly more by core activities than balance activities, from all three perspectives. Results also indicated that family functioning was very similar to dual-parent families while family leisure involvement among single-parent families was less. Implications for practitioners and recommendations for further research are discussed.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Marriott School of Management; Recreation Management

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2007-07-20

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd2041

Keywords

balance leisure patterns, core leisure patterns, family adaptability, family cohesion, family functioning, family leisure patterns, dual-parent family, single-parent family

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