Degree Name

BS

Department

Teacher Education

College

David O. McKay School of Education

Defense Date

2018-03-09

Publication Date

2018-06-01

First Faculty Advisor

Alessandro Rosborough

First Faculty Reader

Alaska Black-Hults

Honors Coordinator

Bryant Jensen

Abstract

This paper considers the discourse, or communication, that occurs in dual immersion programs in Utah. I take a sociocultural perspective to address the question of whether and how these programs are meeting the unique needs of the students enrolled in them. I consider two tasks frequently viewed in five consecutive days of filming: mirroring/repeated phrases and partner talk. Findings suggest that although they have promise, they often do not meet the intended aims of comprehension and language development. The findings also show that these tasks do little to empower participants. The conclusions and implications suggest that commonly accepted tasks in monolingual classrooms are not appropriate or useful for classrooms where second languages are taught.

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