Title

A Comparison of Turn-of-the-Century and Turn-of-the-Millennium Speech in Georgia

Keywords

Elsewhere shift, speech, Georgia, contemporary speech

Abstract

The Elsewhere Shift, defined here as the lowering and retraction of the front lax vowels, is a now-widespread phenomenon in North American English. However, few studies document its presence in the South. This study analyzes speech from two corpora of Georgians, one representing contemporary speech and another representing language from a century ago, to demonstrate the presence of the Elsewhere Shift in the South. Generalized additive mixed-effects models fit to formant measurements extracted from these corpora suggest a recession of traditional Southern dialect features (glide-weakening in PRICE, the Southern Vowel Shift) and the adoption of the Elsewhere Shift (the low black merger, retracted front lax vowels), both in relative position in the F1-F2 space as well as formant trajectory shape. In addition to providing the first real-time analysis of English in Urban Georgia, this confirms the Elsewhere Shift's Status as a pan-North America dialect feature.

Original Publication Citation

Joseph A. Stanley. “A comparison of turn-of-the-century and turn-of-the-millennium speech in Georgia.” (2022) Proceedings of the 6th Annual Linguistics Conference at UGA.

Document Type

Conference Paper

Publication Date

2019

Publisher

University of Georgia

Language

English

College

Humanities

Department

Linguistics

University Standing at Time of Publication

Assistant Professor

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