Keywords

Native language, discrimination, American English

Abstract

Recent studies suggest that listeners are able to identify regional varieties of their native language (Clopper & Pisoni, 2007; Gooskens, 2005). These studies have also demonstrated that listeners use specific vowel, consonant, and intonational variation to make these identifications (Clopper & Pisoni, 2004; van Bezooijen & Gooskens, 1999). In most of these previous studies, however, listeners were asked to identify varieties with which they had at least some contact. What is not known is whether listeners can also distinguish between varieties with which they have little or no exposure and what linguistic features they use to do so. In particular, the current study examined the ability of naïve listeners to discriminate among dialects with which they have little or no experience.

Original Publication Citation

Baker, W. & Nay. L. (2010). American English listeners’ discrimination of Australian, South African and Southeast England Varieties of English: What variation matters?

Document Type

Conference Paper

Publication Date

2010

Publisher

University of Texas at San Antonio

Language

English

College

Humanities

Department

Linguistics

University Standing at Time of Publication

Associate Professor

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