Keywords

Second language, Marshallese, phonetics, secondary articulation

Abstract

The current study determines the influence of cross-language similarity on native English speakers’ perception and production of Marshallese consonant contrasts. Marshallese provides a unique opportunity to study this influence because all Marshallese consonants have a secondary articulation. Results of discrimination and production tasks indicate that learners more easily acquire sounds if they are perceptually less similar to native language phonemes. In addition, the degree of cross-language similarity seemed to affect perception and production and may also interact with the effect of orthography.

Original Publication Citation

Sturman, H. W., Baker-Smemoe, W., Carreño, S., & Miller, B. B. (2016). Learning the Marshallese Phonological System: The Role of Cross-language Similarity on the Perception and Production of Secondary Articulations. Language and Speech, 59(4), 462–487. https://doi.org/10.1177/0023830915614603

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2015

Publisher

Language and Speech

Language

English

College

Humanities

Department

Linguistics

University Standing at Time of Publication

Associate Professor

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