Keywords

adaptation, mortality rates, natural selection, predation, prey

Abstract

Predation is ubiquitous in nature and can be an important component of both ecological and evolutionary interactions. One of the most striking features of predators is how often they cause evolutionary diversification in natural systems. Here, we review several ways that this can occur, exploring empirical evidence and suggesting promising areas for future work. We also introduce several papers recently accepted in Diversity that demonstrate just how important and varied predation can be as an agent of natural selection. We conclude that there is still much to be done in this field, especially in areas where multiple predator species prey upon common prey, in certain taxonomic groups where we still know very little, and in an overall effort to actually quantify mortality rates and the strength of natural selection in the wild.

Original Publication Citation

Johnson, Jerald B.; Belk, Mark C. 2020. "Predators as Agents of Selection and Diversification" Diversity 12, no. 11: 415.

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2020-10-31

Publisher

Diversity

Language

English

College

Life Sciences

Department

Biology

University Standing at Time of Publication

Full Professor

Included in

Biology Commons

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