Keywords

Alzheimer’s, body mass index, dementia, late life, midlife obesity

Abstract

Dementia and obesity are significant public health concerns. Alzheimer's disease affects 5.3 million adults, while 72.5 million adults are obese. Emerging evidence linking body mass index (BMI) and dementia suggest that, although a high BMI in midlife is associated with a greater risk for dementia, a high BMI in late life is considered protective and should not necessarily be considered a risk factor for dementia. Beginning in midlife, practitioners should trend patient BMI numbers. Major fluctuations during this time should be monitored and nutritional counseling and cognitive screenings offered to help patients maintain a healthy BMI and detect early cognitive decline.

Original Publication Citation

Slade, S. J. & Ravert, P. (2012). Late-life body mass index and dementia: An integrative literature review. Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. 8(9), 725-728.

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2012-10-09

Publisher

The Journal for Nurse Practitioners

Language

English

College

Nursing

University Standing at Time of Publication

Full Professor

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