Title

A Longitudinal Examination of Family Processes, Demographic Variables, and Adolescent Weight

Keywords

adolescence, control, family processes, multilevel modeling, obesity, overweight, parenting style

Abstract

Nationally representative studies estimate that almost one in five adolescents in the United States is overweight. This is a major concern for individuals’ physical and psychological health and the overall economy in terms of health care costs and loss of productivity. A 12- to 14-year-old subsample of 4,688 adolescents from the NLSY97 cohort was used to address the association between family processes, demographic variables, and adolescent body mass index (BMI) percentile over 4 years. The final model indicated that frequency of family meals, gender, race, control, and mothers’ BMI were important predictors of adolescent BMI percentile over time. Mothers’ BMI was the strongest predictor of adolescent BMI percentile. More frequent family meals led to decreases in BMI percentile over time, whereas males, African Americans, and Latinos had higher average BMI percentiles than other groups.

Original Publication Citation

Price, J., Day, R.D., & Yorgason, J.B. (2009). A longitudinal examination of family processes, demographic variables, and adolescent weight. Marriage and Family Review, 45, 310-330. doi:10.1080/01494920902735299

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2009-04-02

Publisher

Marriage & Family Review

Language

English

College

Family, Home, and Social Sciences

Department

Family Life

University Standing at Time of Publication

Full Professor

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