Title

Shy and still struggling: Examining the relations between subtypes of social withdrawal and well‐being in the 30s

Keywords

early adulthood, emerging adulthood, shyness, social withdrawal

Abstract

There is growing evidence that motivations reflecting social withdrawal are linked to various correlates and outcomes in childhood, adolescence, and emerging adulthood. However, little work has examined the subtypes of withdrawn motivations in early adulthood. Hence, the purpose of this study was to compare shy, avoidant, unsocial, mixed‐withdrawn, and non‐withdrawn men and women in early adulthood on indices of well‐being. This study drew on a large, representative U.S. sample of 5,000 participants (2,930 female) ages 30–35 (Mage = 32.50, SD = 1.70). Findings reveal that shy, avoidant, and mixed‐withdrawal individuals experience more negative outcomes (e.g., receiving less education) and lower well‐being (e.g., lower life satisfaction, more internalizing problems, and regret) in early adulthood.

Original Publication Citation

Nelson, LJ, Jorgensen, NA, Clifford, BN. Shy and still struggling: Examining the relations between subtypes of social withdrawal and well‐being in the 30s. Social Development. 2020; 00: 1– 17. https://doi-org.erl.lib.byu.edu/10.1111/sode.12486

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2020-09-27

Publisher

Social Development

Language

English

College

Family, Home, and Social Sciences

Department

Family Life

University Standing at Time of Publication

Full Professor

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