Title

Drug Use and Job Quits: A Longitudinal Analysis

Keywords

job separation, quitting, unemployment, drugs, job mobility

Abstract

Voluntary job separation, or quitting, occurs for a variety of reasons. Although it is often a positive move, it may also lead to periods of unemployment. Studies suggest that one factor that may be implicated in the likelihood of quitting is illicit drug use: Adult drug users may not only quit more frequently but also have a heightened probability of unemployment following a quit. Yet, prior research has not taken a sufficient longitudinal perspective, considered contemporary research on job mobility, nor examined gender differences. We assessed the association using longitudinal data on 8,512 individuals followed from 1984 to 1995. The results indicated that marijuana and cocaine use were associated with a higher probability of quitting. Moreover, marijuana use among males, but not females, was associated with a higher likelihood of experiencing periods of unemployment following a quit. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding gender-distinct patterns of drug use and occupational trajectories.

Original Publication Citation

Hoffmann, John P., Mikaela J. Dufur, and Lynn Huang. 2007. “Drug Use and Job Quits: A Longitudinal Analysis.” Journal of Drug Issues 37(3): 569-596.

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2007-7

Publisher

Journal of Drug Issues

Language

English

College

Family, Home, and Social Sciences

Department

Sociology

University Standing at Time of Publication

Full Professor

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