Title

Effects of Various Methods of Assigning and Evaluating Required Reading in One General Education Course

Keywords

General Education Courses, Assigning courses, reading assignments

Abstract

Different approaches to creating out-of-class reading assignments for university general education courses might affect the amount of time students actually spend reading. Five instructors of a required religion/philosophy class used different approaches to assign out-of-class reading. Subsequently, their students (n = 504) were surveyed about their reading completion, their motivation to read, and ways that out-of-class readings affected their learning and personal study habits. Results showed that students who were assigned to read for a specific number of minutes outside of class completed the task more consistently than those who received other forms of reading assignments. Results also indicated that students who were graded on their outside reading completed it more frequently than those who were not graded.

Original Publication Citation

John Hilton III, Brad Wilcox, Tim Morrison, and David Wiley. “Effects of various methods of assigning and evaluating required reading in one general education course.” Journal of College Reading and Learning, 41 (1), 7-28 (2010).

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2014-07-07

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Language

English

College

Religious Education

Department

Ancient Scripture

University Standing at Time of Publication

Associate Professor

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