Title

Work–family interface for married women: a Singapore and United States cross‐cultural comparison

Keywords

family‐to‐work conflict, job satisfaction, marital satisfaction, schedule flexibility, work–family interface, work‐to‐family conflict

Abstract

This study is a cross‐cultural comparison of the work–family interface for married women using two nationally representative samples from Singapore (n = 467) and the United States of America (n = 923). This study demonstrates how the direction and strength of paths in a model of the work–family interface differs between a collectivist nation (Singapore) and an individualistic nation (the USA). Results revealed that schedule flexibility decreased family‐to‐work conflict in the United States but increased family‐to‐work conflict and increased depression in Singapore. Clear differences in the direction of effects in schedule flexibility and family‐to‐work conflict in the United States and Singapore suggest that national culture (e.g. collectivist vs individualistic) is an important factor in theorizing about the work–family interface for married women.

Original Publication Citation

Fackrell, T., Galovan, A.M., Hill, E. J., & Holmes, E.K. (2013). Work-family interface for married women: A Singapore and United States cross-cultural comparison. Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources, 51, 347-363. doi:10.1111/j.1744-7941.2013.00065.x.

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2013-04-08

Publisher

Asian Pacific Journal of Human Resources

Language

English

College

Family, Home, and Social Sciences

Department

Family Life

University Standing at Time of Publication

Full Professor

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