Abstract

This study examined the efficacy of the My Best Self 101 (MBS101) self-compassion module, an internet-delivered self-compassion training within a non-clinical general population sample. Using a randomized-waitlist control design, this study examined whether module participants experienced significant improvements in self-compassion, well-being, and body image compared to waitlist controls. Participants were 228 adults (mean age 30.3, 23.5% male and 76.5% female). At pretest and posttest, both groups completed self-report measures of self-compassion, subjective well-being, and body image. Repeated measures mixed model analyses revealed that compared to waitlist controls, participants who used the MBS101 self-compassion module reported significant improvements in self-compassion, well-being, and body image with effect sizes ranging from medium to large. These results lend evidence to support the MBS101 self-compassion module as a promising resource to improve well-being and body image. Future research should examine its efficacy in different populations and focus on expanding its content.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Psychology

Rights

https://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2020-06-17

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd11730

Keywords

self-compassion, subjective well-being, body image, online intervention

Language

english

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