Abstract

Deficiencies in friction stir welding (FSW) numerical modelling are identified. Applicability of flow stress data derived from hot compression, hot torsion, and split Hopkinson bar testing methods is assessed. A new method of measuring flow stresses in the stir zone of a friction stir welding tool is developed. This test utilizes a non-consumable flat-faced cylindrical tool of different geometries that induces a vertical and rotational load on the material of interest. A constant vertical load and rpm value is used for each test yielding the resulting motor torque and temperature generation to define the material response. Experimental samples are cross-sectioned, polished, and etched to reveal the material flow behavior below the tool. A viscosity-based model is used to quantify the shear stress and rim shear rate present in the shear layer below the tool. This test is referred to as the high-pressure shear (HPS) experiment. A parameter window is developed for two alloys of interest, AA6061-T6 and AA2219-T87 and results are reported. The HPS experiments yields flow stress estimates that are pressure and strain rate dependent. Different tool geometries are explored to understand the impact of the "dead zone"at the center axis of the tool. When compared to hot compression and hot torsion the HPS flow stress datasets trend 20-86 % lower across the two materials tested.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Ira A. Fulton College of Engineering and Technology

Rights

https://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2021-06-17

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd11719

Keywords

high-pressure, shear, flow stress, FSW

Language

english

Included in

Engineering Commons

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