Abstract

This study explored how women involved in U.S. politics visually framed themselves on their Instagram pages. While recent research in political communications examined the use of Facebook and Twitter, few studies assessed Instagram's role in the game of politics. Guided by political and visual framing theories, a quantitative content analysis of Instagram posts (N = 1,947) from women involved in U.S. politics was conducted. This examination allowed for an exploration of how these public figures framed themselves on Instagram and the extent to which they shared personal content, despite their varied involvement in U.S. politics. Results showed that: both Democrat and Republican women shared political content more often than personal content; Instagram affords a visual-first emphasis for different political issues; and women most often framed themselves as the credible, ideal stateswoman, while still showcasing their personality. Implications for this study affirm Instagram as a legitimate political communications platform, despite its reputation as a food and travel haven.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Fine Arts and Communications

Rights

https://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2020-02-24

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd11682

Keywords

women in politics, Instagram, political framing, self-framing, personalized politics

Language

english

Included in

Fine Arts Commons

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