Abstract

Research indicates that adolescence is an especially crucial time for developing habits of values congruent behavior that will persist throughout the lifespan. Past research has suggested that parents may play an important role in socializing their children, however few studies have looked at the mechanism through which this socialization occurs. The current study explored associations between different types of proactive and reactive parenting and value congruent behavior using nationally representative data from across three years during adolescence. Additionally, the current study attempted to further explain these associations through the mechanism of extrinsic and intrinsic values regulation. The current sample included 500 families including parents (67.7% two-parent families, 69.9% of mothers and 68% of fathers had a bachelor's degree or higher) and an adolescent (Mean = 13.89 years, 50.9% female, 70.4% European Descent) from the Northwestern USA. The hypotheses of the study were tested using structural equation models. Results of the study were not strong enough to confirm direct or indirect associations among study variables, and results should be interpreted with caution. One finding suggested that reactive parenting practices may be detrimental, above and beyond the level of autonomy granted to adolescents, in that reactive parenting practices were associated with higher rates of deviant peer association and delinquent behavior. Discussion focuses on future studies and methodologies that may be better able to detect meaningful associations.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences

Rights

https://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2020-07-27

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd11350

Keywords

proactive parenting, adolescence, values, autonomy-support, deviant peer, delinquency, Self Determination Theory

Language

english

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