Abstract

In an attempt to help middle school art students to be more engaged and have more ownership over their learning experience, the researcher, who is also the classroom teacher, created and implemented student-directed and teacher-supported strategies. Using a design-based research methodology, the author conducted a qualitative study over a twelve-week period investigating the affordances or limitations of implementing more student-directed strategies. The results showed three categories of student responses. The students that were ready and capable to direct their own learning excelled, guiding their own learning, and were able to generate personally relevant and disciplinary connected art. The second category of students initially did not have the artistic skills or the skills necessary to direct their own learning. Through interventions and scaffolding, these students were able to direct their learning and make personally relevant and disciplinary connected art. The last category of students struggled to guide their learning, were unmotivated, and relied on the teacher to direct their learning. The results suggest that neither a teacher-centered or student-directed model alone is adequate to achieve desired outcomes of students guiding their learning and achieving high academic standards. There is a need for a teacher to perceive and adapt their practice to address the multifaceted needs of students.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Fine Arts and Communications

Rights

https://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2020-06-03

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd11209

Keywords

student-directed, teacher-centered, autonomy, motivation, student ownership

Language

english

Included in

Fine Arts Commons

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