Abstract

Six forest areas destroyed by fire representing different seral stages of aspen development and conifer invasion were studied to determine successional dynamics and the related livestock and big game use. Factors measured were: (a) age, basal area, density and frequency of aspen and conifer trees; (b) density and frequency of under-story species; (c) forage production for forbs, grasses, and browse, and (d) animal-days use for deer, cattle and sheep. Aspen appeared in the community the spring following the fire and conifers appeared fifteen to twenty years later. Conifers had begun to dominate aspen on an eighty-two year old stand. The density and frequency of understory species was influenced by grazing pressure, age of the cormnunity and conifer basal area. Maximum densities were reached twenty years after the fire. Forage production was influenced by the age of the community and conifer basal area. Maximum forage production was reached on the twenty-one year old burn. Animal use was influenced by the amount of forage production, conifer basal area and competitive use by other animals.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Plant and Wildlife Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1973-08-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/Letd411

Keywords

Forest regeneration; Forest ecology; Conifers; Aspen

Language

English

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