Abstract

The effect of trampling on vegetation and soil, as a result of recreational pressure, was studied in the Buffalo campground of the Targhee National Forest, Idaho. Site deterioration was most evident in the forty-two year old site. The tree stand had matured, but there were few young trees and tree reproduction had been reduced to ten seedlings per acre for Pinus contorta. Only two shrub species were sampled with a combined population of eight individuals per acre. Most of the grass species had been seeded; forbs provided 20% of the ground cover, 13% was bare ground and 71% litter. The soil had become compacted, and a hard-pan had formed. Similar deterioration was found in the six-year old site, but to a lesser degree. The year-old site was most similar to the control area, but site deterioration had occurred. It is difficult to reverse or halt site deterioration and still maintain the area as a public facility. Seeding and rest-rotation could improve the oldest site; younger sites could be maintained by restrotation, to allow existing vegetation to re-stock the depleted areas.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Plant and Wildlife Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1975-08-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/Letd386

Keywords

Soil pollution; Plants, Protection of; Buffalo Campground, Targhee National Forest, Island Park (Idaho)

Language

English

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