Abstract

The object of this study was to determine whether or not Lodgepole pine is successfully invading meadows near ponds in the western Uinta Mountains as a preliminary step to the invasion of the Spruce-Fir climax forest. Line transects were established at three sites near Trial Lake extending from forest to wet meadow. Along these transects the soil was studied to determine percent organic matter, pH, depth to mineral soil, and texture. Also the depth of the water table was measured and the topography plotted. The age and size of the trees along the transect was determined, and the extent of some root systems was noted. Conifers found growing in the dry meadow were stunted and no conifers were found growing on peat deposits over 17 inches. The water table was found within about 8 inches of the surface and the soil conditions suggested poor aeration. The combination of peat and high water level accounted for the stunting of the trees. The trees were apparently unable to convert the dry meadow to forest and thus, the climax for hydrarch succession in this area is a meadow vegetation of grasses and sedges instead of the conifer forest.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Plant and Wildlife Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1969-08-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/Letd383

Keywords

Conifers; Trial Lake (Utah); Uintah Mountains (Utah and Wyo.)

Language

English

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