Abstract

A balance of iodine within the rats is important for the maintenance of normal thyroid function. Because of Hymenolepis d[imi]nuta's affinity for certain nutrients, it may upset norma[l] iodine balance in the rat. To determine this, tapeworm-infected and non-infected rats were given 125Iodide orally and the percent uptake of iodide by the thyroid and the amount of radioac[tiv]ity in the tapeworms was determined. The percent distribution of the radio-iodinated compounds in the thyroid, tapeworms and feces was also determined. These procedures were repeated except 125Thyroxine was administered orally. There was a decrease in percent iod[id]e uptake by thyroids of tapeworm-infected rats receiving 125I; however, there was no indication of a hypothyroid condition. Iodide, T4, and T3 were present in the worms, but not enough to account for the decrease in thyroid uptake. The more tapeworms present in the rat, the greater fecal excretion of iodide and T4. Due to this, tapeworms may cause a hypothyroid condition over a longer period of time than this study. The data indicated that T4 was metabolized by the tapeworms.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Plant and Wildlife Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1970-08-05

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/Letd199

Keywords

Hymenolepis diminuta; Parasites; Iodine in the body

Language

English

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