Abstract

Research has shown that exercise has the potential to improve couple relationships. This study contributes to current literature by examining the associations between exercise, its duration, and its intensity and daily clinical couple interactions. Participants were 22 married couples in a treatment-as-usual setting who completed daily diaries about daily behaviors and marital interactions. Multilevel models were run, and results showed that wives who exercised were more likely to report a negative interaction with their husband that day. When wives exercised longer, both they and their husbands were more likely to report positive interactions that day. Interestingly, if husbands exercised longer on a given day, their wives were less likely to report positive interactions and there was no association between husbands' perception of interactions and their own exercise duration. Finally, we found that when wives exercised more intensely, both she and her husband were less likely to report positive marital interactions. These results have implications for clinicians working with couples in therapy.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Marriage and Family Therapy

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2018-12-01

Document Type

Thesis

Keywords

exercise, couple therapy, marital interactions, therapy interventions, daily diary

Language

english

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